Brexit for lawyers

By Nick Holmes on July 5, 2016
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Filed under Constitutional law, Democracy

Extracts from my latest post in Internet Newsletter for Lawyers about the legal and constitutional issues surrounding Brexit:

As opinions on this change by the hour, your best bet is to follow the latest comments on Twitter from those lawyers who are focussing on the constitutional implications of the Brexit vote and thence read their more considered writings on their blogs. I’ve created a Twitter list where you can follow the leading commentators as a group. They are:

Mark Elliott (@ProfMarkElliott), Professor of Public Law at the University of Cambridge, who blogs at Public Law for Everyone, has recently focussed on the constitutional implications of Brexit, most recently On why, as a matter of law, triggering Article 50 does not require Parliament to legislate.

David Allen Green (@davidallengreen), who blogs about law and policy as Jack of Kent and is also a legal commentator at FT.com, is probably the most prolific tweeter and writer about Brexit.

Carl Gardner (@carlgardner), a former government lawyer who blogs about public law as Head of Legal, is also a prolific Tweeter about Brexit.

Jolyon Maugham (@JolyonMaugham) QC, a tax lawyer who blogs at Waiting for Godot, is currently commenting extensively on Brexit on his blog and on the broadcast media. His latest post on The Big Green Button Bill argues that invoking Article 50 would require an Act of Parliament.

Follow also UCL Constitution Unit (@ConUnit_UCL): Constitution Unit Blog.

On immigration: Colin Yeo (@ColinYeo1) at Free Movement.

On human rights: Adam Wagner (@AdamWagner1) at UK Human Rights Blog.

Image: By Jose Manuel Mota on Flickr.

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